Well-Fed Eyes

If you are what you eat and the eyes are the windows to the soul, nutrition can affect just how clearly you see through your windows.

The cornea of the eye can be likened to a window letting in light that is transformed into vision, images produced on the retina.

As the inner lining of the eye, the retina contains around 127 million light receptors: cones that produce colors and rods that adjust the contrast between light and dark.

Looking at the cellular level of the retina reveals the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), a very thin layer of cube-like cells beneath the cones and rods. RPE cells channel oxygen and nutrients to these light receptors as well as recycle nutrients and remove waste.

The relationship between RPE cells and light receptors is crucial to eye health. And the right kind of nutrition is vital to keeping this relationship healthy.

Poor Nutrition Can Lead to Vision Loss

A 2019 study published in the Molecular Nutrition & Food Research journal determined that unhealthy diets can result in oxidative stress and impaired function of the retinal pigment epithelium. In other words, the wrong food can negatively alter vision at the cellular level.

Just like a clogged colon lined with impacted waste from poor nutrition, a similar effect can happen in the retina as a result of not eating well. The retinal pigment epithelium becomes unable to effectively detoxify the visual center of the eye.

A leading cause of vision loss is age-related macular degeneration (AMD), affecting the central part of the retina. AMD onset is caused by damage to retinal pigment epithelial cells. But there is nutritional protection from such eye issues.

A Few Eye-Healthy Nutrients

According to the American Optometric Association, a variety of antioxidant compounds that include beta-carotene, lutein and zeaxanthin can help to prevent AMD or slow its progression. These carotenoids build and maintain the thickness of the retinal pigment epithelium, so they should be a regular part of a healthy diet.

A 2017 study found that although RPE cells consume a number of different nutrients, the amino acid proline tops the list. It seems that this nonessential amino acid—meaning the body can produce it—is essential for the retinal pigment epithelium. Besides, if you are sick or under stress, your body may not be able to produce enough.

Omega-3 essential fatty acids have been shown to provide vision protection, and flaxseed oil delivers a plant-based source.

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The key ingredient for a healthy body is wholesome food because that is where you get the bulk of the nutrients your cells need to maintain physical and mental well-being. And so it follows that what’s good for the body is healthy for the visual system.

Healthy Vision AIM

AIM has always promoted the fine idea of eating well, along with providing whole-food concentrates and targeted supplements to further increase the intake of natural nutrients that support overall body health, including the visual system.

The finest natural nutrients come from food that grows out of the earth. AIM harnessed a concentration of that goodness in whole-food powders. For example, Just Carrots and LeafGreens support eye health with nutrients such as beta-carotene and lutein.

One of the many amino acids in ProPeas is proline, the preferred food of the RPE cells that literally feed and detoxify the eyes.

As a targeted supplement, GinkgoSense supports blood flow to the extremities and contains the antioxidant compounds lutein and zeaxanthin.

For plant-based omega-3, AIMega delivers an organic source of this essential fatty acid from flaxseed oil.

Supplementing a healthy diet with AIM products such as these helps to ensure a steady supply of eye-healthy nutrients.

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The AIM Companies has been dedicated to improving the quality of people’s lives with life-changing products like BarleyLife and Herbal Fiberblend and by rewarding passionate Members with a free-enterprise compensation plan.

 

Increase Your Risk of Life! With Fats!

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Being alive is pretty exciting. As a living, breathing human, you have a lot of great options available. You can read a book, hug your children, whistle in the shadow of a statue or admire a nearby toucan. It is literally up to you. And now, there may be a simple way to extend the miracle of life!

According to a study published in the  Journal of Clinical Lipidologyfolks with higher levels of of EPA and DHA omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in their blood tended to have a greater rate of survival when compared to those with the lowest levels.

The study analyzed 6,500 post-menopausal women ( ages 65-80). They had their polyunsaturated fat levels tested in 1996 and their health outcomes were tracked until 2014. Other factors were also measured: smoking and drinking habits, exercise levels, genetic history, etc. By the end of the study, nearly one-third of the women had passed. Scientists put all the information together and were able to say that their “findings support the view that higher EPA and DHA omega-3 levels are associated with better overall health.”

Researchers estimate that it takes only one gram of EPA or DHA to increase PUFA levels from the lowest to the highest. Polyunsaturated fatty acids can be acquired from fish or from seeds that come from plants like flax or sunflower. Making sure that there is an adequate amount in your diet might extend your life, all it takes is a few simple dietary changes and/or regular supplement usage.

Related AIM Products

AIMega contains 2 grams of polyunsaturated fatty acids from the oils of sunflower seed, flaxseed, olives and sesame seeds in every three-capsule serving.

CellSparc 360 has 100 mg of palm oil and 238 mg of fish oil in every serving along with CoQ10.

And GingkoSense contains 2.5 grams of DHA (as fish oil) along with the world-famous ginkgo biloba extract,  bilberry extract, lutein and zeaxanthin.

These great products may help extend a great life! Try one today.

3 Exciting New Discoveries About Omega-3 You Need to Know

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There are a lot of fats in this world, and they get a bad rap.  Even the word “fat” has a lot negative connotations hanging from it like so much unwanted adipose tissue. But fats can be a good thing. For starters, you need fat in your diet because it helps the body produce energy, build cell membranes and absorb minerals. The trick is knowing which fats are healthy and which ones are not.

Trans fat, for example, is bad for you, but polysaturated fats like omega-3 and omega-6 can be very beneficial. In fact, the omegas are necessary for blood clotting, muscle movement and more. They are also well-known for their ability to promote heart health, but a few recent studies show they may have other benefits as well.

Omega-3 and B-Vitamins Team Up to Tackle Alzheimer’s Disease 

A study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that a combination of B vitamins and omega-3 fatty acids significantly reduced age-related brain shrinkage, a major contributor to Alzheimer’s disease.  Those with higher baselines of omega-3 had 40% less shrinkage compared to the placebo group.  Try Peak Endurance with your AIMega.

Low Levels of Omega-3 Linked to Bipolar Disorder

Researchers at Penn State found that sufferers of bipolar disorder tend to have lower levels of omega-3 fatty acids that cross the blood-brain barrier than people who do not suffer from that affliction. The why behind it is still unclear. Some researchers speculate that people with bipolar disorders may process fatty acids differently. The scientists behind the study are currently investigating dietary approaches using fatty acids for bipolar disorder.  This study was published in Bipolar Disorders.

Omega-3 May Help Prevent Rheumatoid Arthritis 

A study published in Rheumatology looked at whether or not omega-3 could lower someone’s risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis is caused by a fault in the immune system. Autoantibodies erroneously attack organs and tissue which causes pain and suffering. In the study, blood tests showed a link between low levels of omega-3 and high levels of out-of-whack antibodies. The researchers speculate that omega-3 fatty acids may be able to play a role in the prevention of rheumatoid arthritis in those who are at risk but haven’t developed RA symptoms yet.

Get Your Omegas From AIMega!

The AIM Companies offers the world’s best fats in its essential AIMega. Your body can’t produce omega fatty acids on its own, so you need to make sure you get enough for heart health, immune health, to reduce inflammation and more!

7 Nutritional Strategies for Headaches

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If you suffer from headaches, migraine or otherwise, finding dietary strategies may prove difficult. Take the banana as an example.  The banana has a lot of good stuff in it: potassium, magnesium, vitamin B 6 and vitamin C. A lot of these nutrients and minerals appear on this list of headache fighters. However, bananas also find themselves on the list of possible migraine trigger foods. That means, finding a nutritional strategy is really an individual journey, one that should possibly be even undertaken with the aid of a health care professional.  With that said, here’s a list of vitamins and minerals that have shown promise for headache prevention and elimination.

  1. Vitamin B-2 (Riboflavin) 
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50% RDI of B-2, B-6, B-12

According to current lines of scientific thought, migraine sufferers are believed to have an impaired ability to metabolize oxygen due to mitochondrial dysfunction. Since riboflavin plays such an important role in metabolism, it could therefore improve mitochondrial functioning and overall oxygen metabolism. The majority of test subjects in a Belgian study saw a significant reduction in migraine attacks after consuming 400 mg of vitamin B-2 daily.

2. Magnesium

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High concentration topical magnesium

Of all the nutrients on this list, magnesium probably has the best scientific evidence backing it for migraine prevention, migraine reduction and headache relief in general.

  • First, people who suffer from migraines are believed to have magnesium deficiencies in their brains.
  •  Secondly, serotonin deficiency can cause migraines. Guess what nutrient balances serotonin levels? It’s magnesium.
  • Thirdly, it’s shown promise as a way to relieve PMS-related headaches.
  • Magnesium may also be able to stop small, calcium-related blood clots from forming and causing headaches.
  • For general headaches, magnesium may relieve tension and spasms in the head and neck muscles.

3. CoQ10

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60 mg of CoQ10, balanced EFAs

A 2002 study found that migraine sufferers who took CoQ10 for periods of three months or more reduced their frequency of attacks by half.

Sources (1-3): Migraine Trust, The Magnesium Miracle

4. Omega 3 Fatty Acids

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Balanced omega fatty acids

In a small study published in Pain, researchers found that balanced omega fatty acids reduced headache pain and frequency and improved quality of life. A 2002 study on adolescents found that omega 3’s may be beneficial for recurring migraines.

5. Folate, B6, and B12

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10% RDI folate and other B Vitamins

A study released in early 2015 linked a diet high in the B vitamins folate (B-9), B-6 and B-12 to a reduction in migraine frequencies.

6. Probiotics

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Friendly bacteria

Some headaches are associated with a stomach bug known as helicobacter pylori.  Eliminating that stomach bug with antibiotics cleared up the headaches. However, if those people followed up the antibiotics with probiotics, they only had a 20% chance of relapse. Those who took the antibiotics alone were 50% likely to relapse.  Source: CBS News

Counter-intuitively, irritable bowel syndrome can cause headaches. Probiotics may relieve IBS and would then reduce headaches in that way.

7. Vitamin B-3, Calcium and Vitamin D

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38% RDI Calcium, 70% RDI Vitamin D, 26% RDI Magnesium

Vitamin B-3, calcium and vitamin D have all shown promise as a way to reduce premenstrual headaches.