Kosher-certified Nutritional Products

Kosher US

The AIM Companies™ (AIM) is proud to announce that several of our nutritional products will be certified kosher by OK Kosher Certification. Those who practice the Jewish faith can rest easy when purchasing and consuming AIM products. Furthermore, kosher food laws set a high bar in terms of cleanliness, purity and quality. This is just another example of AIM’s dedication to providing the best, unadulterated products on the market. Our certified kosher products will be denoted with a sticker initially, but the kosher symbol will soon be added to the labels.

AIM BarleyLife, Just Carrots and RediBeets wholefood powder concentrates are now kosher-certified in the United States. They will soon be certified in our international markets as well. Watch for the OK symbol.

Can You Help Protect Your Unborn Baby from Alzheimer’s Disease?

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During pregnancy, mothers often fret over the health of their unborn children. They make sure to eat right and exercise, ensuring baby emerges optimally healthy. Some benefits of mom’s hard work are readily apparent: healthy skin, active eyes, a good skeleton, etc. However, there is evidence that mom’s diet may have far-reaching, long-lasting effects on baby’s health.

According to a Canadian study published in Acta Neuropathologicain utero vitamin A may reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s disease later on, way later on.  The scientists looked at genetically modified mice. Some of the mice were deprived of vitamin A when they were in the womb, others were deprived shortly after they were born, another group was given supplements and a final group just ate a normal, boring mouse diet.

The mice that were deprived of vitamin A performed worse on memory and learning tests when they were full-grown. Additionally, there was evidence that in utero vitamin-A deprivation  had long-term effects even if they were given vitamin A supplements after being born. The good news is that some of the negative effects were reversible when vitamin A was introduced into their diets later.

Additionally, vitamin A deficiency was linked to an increase in a protein (amyloid beta) associated with Alzheimer’s disease.

The researchers also looked at 330 elderly Chinese subjects and found that three quarters of those subjects who were vitamin A deficient were also afflicted with cognitive impairment. Less than half of those with adequate vitamin A levels suffered from similar impairment. Vitamin A deficiency is rare in the west, and it it always best to get vitamin A from dietary sources, like carrots or carrot juice or barley grass juice.

AIM’s Just Carrots provides 420% of your daily vitamin A (from beta-carotene) in every serving and unlike vitamin A supplements, beta-carotene is nontoxic. It might strengthen your immune system, however.

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Alex Frisk in the Net!

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AIM nutrition powered AIM-sponsored Athlete Alex Frisk through academic and athletic demands at Red Deer College during the fall of 2016.

“The term was awesome! I found it easier to be awake all day in terms of energy,” Alex stated. “Even staying after class to study in the library after getting through a day of studying. Not taking naps at all. And the best grades I’ve gotten yet.”

Alex’s knee injury that she received while playing on a men’s roller hockey team in July 2016 hasn’t held her back on the ice. As one of three goalies on the Red Deer College Queens, Alex helped her team to reach first place in the league. Highlights of the fall include being in net for the first annual Pink in the Rink fundraiser in support of women’s cancer. “My parents were there to watch me play,” Alex said. And in the game that put her team in first place, Alex had a shutout, blocking twenty-three shots on net.

In April, Alex will participate in the trials for a spot on Team Canada’s roller hockey team. And in May, she is getting married, so 2017 is shaping up to be an incredible year for this talented young woman.

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5 Nutritional Strategies for Dry Skin

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Not only is the wintertime cold, but it is also dry. This is because cold air holds less water, making it drier. A parched, arctic environment can wreak havoc on the skin, causing an array of discomforts: itching, pain, outbreaks of eczema and psoriasis and, of course, the dreaded dry eyes.  Faithful applications of lotion and moisturizer and fewer showers may help, and there are some dietary approaches as well.

1.Make Sure You’re Not Vitamin Deficient

True vitamin deficiencies are rare in the developed world as we are more likely to be simply insufficient. However, it would be wise to make sure you’re getting adequate amounts of vitamin A, iodine and riboflavin (B2). Deficiencies in these vitamins can cause dry skin as well as other, greater problems.

Related Products: BarleyLife Xtra, BarleyLife, Just Carrots and Peak Endurance

2.Omega-3 Fatty Acids

There is no better nutrition for your skin than omega fatty acids. It’s possible that they can be useful for almost any skin problem, including wrinkles.  They play a key role in the upkeep of the cell membrane which lets the good stuff into the cell and throws the bad stuff out. A well functioning cell membrane also helps to prevent cellular dehydration.

Related Products: AIMega, CellSparc 360

3.Vitamin C 

You may be taking vitamin C to prevent colds during the winter, but mighty vitamin C might help with dry skin, too. Vitamin C is a boon for the skin overall, and a study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found evidence that vitamin C may relieve skin dryness.

Related Products: BarleyLife Xtra, Peak Endurance, CalicAIM

4. Zinc 

One of the symptoms of zinc deficiency is rough, dry skin, but zinc plays such a large role in skincare that it deserves its own bullet point. Many use zinc for acne, eczema and to ward off wrinkles. It provides general antioxidant protection for your skin and plays a big part in the stabilization of the cell membrane, an important component of cell hydration.

Related Products: CalciAIM, ReAssure SP

5. Probiotics 

Believe it or not, the bacteria in your gut can affect the quality of your skin. A belly full of healthy bacteria reduces inflammation. There is good evidence that unchecked inflammation empowers skin problems like acne, eczema and psoriasis. Probiotics assist the skin’s barrier function and helps your skin hold onto more moisture.

Related Products: FloraFood

5 Nutritional Strategies for Acne

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The connections between diet and acne are often overlooked. This is strange due to the fact that one of the most common treatments for acne is prescribing 13-cis-retinoic acid (RA) to suppress sebum in both pill and topical form. This chemical (that sounds like a Star Wars robot) is “a retinoid that could derive from the metabolism of Vitamin A.” (–“The Relationship Between Diet and Acne”).

From the aforementioned paper.

Let’s also not forget that most dermatologists are influenced by nutritional studies to recommend ingestion of isotretinoin with fatty foods. Retinol (Vitamin A), carotenoids (provitamin A) and retinoids (Vitamin A metabolites) are absorbed better with parallel intake of vegetable oils.

Therefore how could we ever rule out the possibility that diet has no effect on acne? Especially when diet influences the absorption of a nutrient or a drug that affects the mitigation of that disease? May be we cannot treat acne with nutrition but we can certainly influence it

With that quote in mind, let’s look at some nutritional choices that could influence acne.

Vitamin A

Vitamin A plays a big role in the health of the skin. A-vitamin deficiency can cause dry skin among other, greater problems. As stated previously, synthetic vitamin A is used to treat acne. This vitamin also helps the skin repair itself and boosts the immune system which can help the body fight off acne-causing bacteria.

Omega-3 

According to Web MD,  “Omega-3s have been shown to control the production of leukotriene B4, a molecule that can increase sebum and cause inflammatory acne.” This finding comes from a study released in 2008 where test subjects consumed omega-3s for two months. At the end of the study, the subjects saw a significant reduction in lesions and inflammation.

Vitamin D 

A 2014 study showed that vitamin A and vitamin D regulate the inflammatory response in acne and suggested that they could be effective nutritional tools.

Low GI Foods

A 2007 study looked at the diets of over forty test subjects. Some subjects were asked to follow a 12-week low-glycemic index diet. The subjects who did had less acne and even lost some weight.

Cut Out Cow’s Milk 

It has been suggested in several studies that the hormones in cow’s milk may worsen acne.  (Instead, you can get your calcium and vitamin D from CalciAIM).

The AIM Companies provides several nutritional supplements that can fit into a low GI diet. Additionally, we have AIMega for omega-3s, CalciAIM for calcium and vitamin D and Just Carrots and BarleyLife Xtra for your vitamin A needs.

Carrots: Orange You Glad You’ve Lowered Your Risk of Age-Related Macular Degeneration?

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It’s pretty well established that carrots and their inherent nutrients are good for your eyeballs. In fact, a complete lack of vitamin A will devastate your corneas, and just a little bit of vitamin A deficiency will dry your peepers out. Beta carotene can also help improve your night vision because vitamin A assists the eyes in converting low light into “easy-to-think” brain signals.

But a study released earlier this month, found that carrots may significantly lower the risk of age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), the most common and severe cause of vision loss in people over sixty.

Researchers from the hallowed halls of Harvard U followed 100,000 people over the age of fifty for twenty-five years and learned that folks who chowed down on the highest levels of the carotenoids zeaxanthin and lutein had a forty percent lower risk of developing the advanced form of ARMD than those who ate the fewest carotenoids. They also found that people who were getting alpha-carotene, beta-carotene and beta-cryptoxanthin in great amounts lowered their risk of AMRD by twenty-five to thirty-five percent when compared to people who didn’t eat that stuff so much.

Researchers accredit lutein and zeaxanthin for these positive benefits due to their ability to protect the macular of the eye by acting as antioxidants that filter out damaging blue light and defending cells from free radical damage.

You’ll find plenty of carotenoids in Just Carrots.

Just Carrots Video

Carrots contain important nutrients such as alpha- and beta-carotene, vitamins B and C, plus calcium, iron, and potassium. With its natural form of beta-carotene,AIM Just Carrots® can be a strong foundation for your good health. The body changes beta-carotene into a natural source of vitamin A, which is essential for strengthening the immune system and promoting healthy cell growth. Just Carrots is 100 percent natural, with no added sugar.