The Mind-Stomach Connection

 

Mind-Stomach-Connection

Many claim to operate on their gut instinct, meaning they rely less on facts and standard procedure and more on certain mysterious feelings that emanate from the midsection, twinges of instinct or suspicion for example.  Although gut-trusting results may vary from gut-owner to gut-owner, there does seem to be a definite connection between the brain and the gut. And several recent studies have illuminated this connection.

A Healthy Gut May Reduce Depression 

You’ve probably heard that depression may be caused in part by and/or worsened by inflammation.  New evidence published in Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics found a link between inflammation that’s related to an unhealthy gut flora and depression.

In other, bigger words: From the Press Release

Persistent low-grade immune-inflammatory processes, oxidative and nitrosative stress, and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activation are integral to the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder.

Researchers believe that if the inflammation damage were mitigated then it might reduce depression. It should be noted that inflammation, in general, is also bad.

A Healthy Gut May Stave Off Alzheimer’s Disease

A study out of Sweden found that an unhealthy gut may hasten the onset of Alzheimer’s disease. Researchers injected gut bacteria from mice with Alzheimer’s into bacteria-free mice, and those mice developed a significant number of beta-amyloid plaques, a marker of the disease.  When the bacteria-free mice where injected with bacteria from Alzheimer’s-free mice, fewer markers appeared, leading researchers to believe that a healthy gut might reduce the appearance of those plaques.  The study was published in Nature.

A Healthy Gut May Improve Your Memory and Lessen Anxiety

Researchers in Ireland ran tests on mice to see if probiotics had any effect on memory and anxiety. They saw positive results in the probiotics-fed mice and decided to test on humans. The test subjects (who  weren’t in the placebo group) reported a drop in their daily stress and had measurably lower levels of cortisol (the stress hormone) in their bodies. Additionally,  volunteers scored higher on memory tests when compared to the placebo group.

Trust Your Gut, Try FloraFood 

If you’re looking for a top-notch, easy-to-stomach probiotic, try AIM’s FloraFood.  This triple-blend probiotic can help get your gut shipshape, relieve inflammation and possibly give you some peace of mind.

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Note: The AIM Companies is a wholefood juice concentrate company that was established in 1982. AIM FloraFood is sold through their network marketing distributors.

Happy Tummy, Happy Mind

FloraFood

Even before there was any science to back it up, we’ve been trusting our guts to help us make important decisions. TV detectives have been using their guts to solve mysteries. Heroes often go with their guts in order to trust that suspicious side character who used to work for the villain. Some people in the scientific field even consider the mass of microbes brewing in our bellies a second brain due to the effect they have on our cognitive functioning and mental health.   So if you’ve heard about the belly-brain theory, it’s probably easy for you to stomach the findings of this new study.

According to the research published in Brain, Behavior and Immunity, the use of probiotics was linked to a decrease in subjects reflecting on unhappy memories.  This is important because depression tends to follow sessions of bad-memory brooding.  Forty subjects participated in the study. For a period of four weeks, half were given placebos, the other half probiotics. Before and after the test,  they were asked to fill out a questionnaire regarding their moods.

Test subjects taking a multispecies probiotics were significantly less likely to stew on their memorialized misgivings.  This is the first evidence that probiotic use could affect mood.

From Medical XPress

“Even if preliminary, these results provide the first evidence that the intake of probiotics may help reduce negative thoughts associated with sad mood. As such, our findings shed an interesting new light on the potential of probiotics to serve as adjuvant or preventive therapy for depression.”

Related Product

FloraFood is a multispecies probiotic to help keep your gut healthy and maybe even happy.