The Circadian Rhythm: Your Body Clock

Have you ever wondered why you feel so bad after traveling across time zones? And what about shift workers, such as long-distance truck drivers, emergency service workers and airline employees or someone under constant stress and unable to maintain regular sleep patterns? When people are required to be awake at a time that their body clocks associate with sleep, it has the potential to disrupt their circadian rhythms¹.

The daily fluctuations of our biological clock represented in the diagram are
fundamental to us. During the day, we are active. We eat, many of us enjoying carbohydrates, having strong metabolisms and efficient digestive systems. However, at night our bodies rely on stored energy for long periods. We are mostly stationary and diges­tion is limited, so eating carbo­hy­drates at this time can be harmful because our meta­bolic rate slows down.

Along with eat­­ing at odd hours, night shift workers and jet-lagged travelers get fewer hours of sleep, which is often of poor quality, and have less exposure to daylight. A study revealed that indi­viduals who did this for ten days experienced circadian disruption². The health implications included:

  • Decreased leptin (-17%)
  • Increased glucose (+6%)
  • Increased insulin (+22%)
  • Reversed daily cortisol rhythm
  • Increased mean arterial pressure (+3%)
  • Reduced sleep efficiency (-20%)

Tips for a healthy circadian rhythm:

Three hours before bed: Dim the lights, minimize the use of television and electronics and avoid vigorous exercise.

One hour before bed: Take AIM Composure, or have a hot bath with Mag-nificence CWR.

Sleep: Choose a cool, dark, quiet room. Try not to take sleeping pills because they will deplete your vitamin D and calcium levels.

Upon wakening: En­­­joy your daily servings of AIM greens with BarleyLife and/or Leaf­Greens. If possible, get 15 minutes of sun­light in the morning.

Try to maintain regular meal times: Daily meals are usually consumed anywhere between 6.30 a.m. and 9.30 p.m., which is a 15-hour time span. A healthier and more circadian-aligned meal pattern would be a 12-hour time span during the daytime followed by 12 hours of overnight fasting.

¹ Reutrakul, S & Khutson, K. Consequences of Circadian Disruption on Cardiometabolic Health, JSMC July 2015.

² Scheer et al, Adverse metabolic and cardiovascular consequences of circadian misalignment. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 106:4453-4458.

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Since 1982, The AIM Companies has been dedicated to improving the quality of people’s lives with life-changing products and by rewarding passionate Members with a free-enterprise compensation plan.

What’s your Sign … of Magnesium Deficiency?

You may or may not be deficient in magnesium—a mineral that is required for over 300 enzymatic reactions in your body. However, given the prevalence of its bodily use, it’s quite possible that you could use a little more. But how do you know if magnesium is something you lack? Let’s look at some of the signs…

10 Common Symptoms of Magnesium Deficiency:

  • Tense muscles or muscle cramps and spasms
  • Headaches
  • Insomnia or poor sleep patterns
  • Low energy levels
  • Irregular heartbeats
  • Lack of strength
  • Anxiety
  • Irritability
  • Premenstrual syndrome (PMS)
  • Poor memory
  • Cold hands and feet (Oops! That’s 11 symptoms … and there’s a whole lot more …)

So what do you do if you think you might be magnesium-deficient? You can correct it in magnificence style…

AIM Mag-nificence offers two absorb-it-through-your-skin options to increase your magnesium intake: Lotion and Spray.  Apply the lotion or spray on your skin to reverse a magnesium deficiency or maintain sufficient levels.

3 Ways Composure Can Help You Sleep

Composure

If you’re losing sleep, you may be suffering from anxiety. On the other hand, if you’re suffering from anxiety, it might be because you’re losing sleep. And if you’re already anxiety prone, then losing sleep has been found to significantly make that anxiety worse.

Over two-thirds of of adults suffer or have suffered from anxiety, and according the Anxiety and Depression Society of America, over three-fourths of those who do, experience at least one anxiety-related sleep disturbance per week. And that can lead to more anxiety and more lost sleep and loss of focus and concentration and so on and so forth, ad nauseam.

Worry no longer. AIM’s Composure, an herbal relaxant made from all-natural plant ingredients may be able to help you get some shut-eye. Here’s how:

  1. Passionflower

Used for centuries as a calming herb, several modern-day studies have indicated the plant’s validity as an anxiety-reliever.  There is some evidence that passionflower may help alleviate insomnia. However, there is even better evidence that passionflower relieves anxiety.

From the University of Maryland Medical Center

Studies of people with generalized anxiety disorder show that passionflower is as effective as the drug oxazepam (Serax) for treating symptoms. Passionflower didn’t work as quickly as oxazepam (day 7 compared to day 4). However, it produced less impairment on job performance than oxazepam. Other studies show that patients who were given passionflower before surgery had less anxiety than those given a placebo, but they recovered from anesthesia just as quickly.

2. Flavonoids and Antioxidants: 

Composure is high in antioxidants, especially in vitexin (from passionflower) shown to relieve inflammatory pain in mice. A study published in the American Journal of Physiology Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology, found a link between low levels of antioxidants and poor sleep.

There is also line of thought in science that inflammation can affect your mood, causing anxiety, depression both result in sleep loss. (Read the Science Here). Oatstraw, horsetail (Shavegrass) and slippery elm are a few of the other good sources of flavonoids and antioxidants found in Composure.

3. Slippery Elm and Marshmallow Root

Both slippery elm and marshmallow root contain polysaccharides which have demulcent properties. They protect the lining of the gut, and this keeps the stomach from becoming too acidic, defending your gut flora. (Note: This is only beneficial if you have a healthy gut flora).  An earlier study has shown that probiotic usage and a healthy gut improves moods which may help you sleep easier.

More on Mood: 

7 Ways Beet Juice Can Make You Happy

6 Reasons You Should Love Vitamin D Even More

Happy Tummy, Happy Mind

Sleep Mag-nificently

Magnificence

Sleep isn’t that exciting. I mean, it’s basically lying still and unaware in a dark room for an extended period of time. But to an insomniac, it’s a blissful and often unachievable Nirvana-like state. And if you’re an older adult, then there’s a fifty percent chance that you have insomnia.

Sleep is so very important. It helps us focus, keeps us in alert and in good spirits, sharpens our reaction times, affects our hormones and our immune systems. Tired people are less productive at work, grumpy and accident prone.  Sleeplessness also increases the risk of depression.

Fortunately, there is a lots of good evidence that magnesium can help people sleep and sleep well. For example, there was that 2012 study, that found that magnesium supplementation was able to lower cortisol concentrations. Cortisol, of course, is commonly known as the stress hormone. That’s probably why insomnia sufferers who supplemented with magnesium were able to improve the quality of their ZZZs.

Journal of Research in Medical Science

Supplementation of magnesium appears to improve subjective measures of insomnia such as ISI score, sleep efficiency, sleep time and sleep onset latency, early morning awakening, and likewise, insomnia objective measures such as concentration of serum renin, melatonin, and serum cortisol, in elderly people.

And in 2009, a report called “Effects of trace element nutrition on sleep patterns in adult women” found that both calcium and magnesium taken together were effective at alleviating sleep problems…

Calcium, vitamin D supplement
Like, in this way, for example

…because one of the main symptoms of magnesium deficiency is insomnia and that a high-magnesium diet had been associated with a deeper, uninterrupted sleep. And calcium helped the brain create melatonin known for its ability to summon the sandman.

So if your midday catnaps have been catnap-napped, it’s time to consider magnesium supplementation!