Under PRESSURE!

CDC statistics reveal that around 75 million adults in America—that’s 1 out of every 3 grown-ups or a whopping 32%—are living with high blood pressure (hypertension) . . . but for how long?

Apparently only 54 percent of those with hypertension have it under control. In 2014, there were 1,100 deaths every day that resulted from high blood pressure as either a primary or contributing cause, over 400,000 American deaths for that year alone.1  

As a result, tens of millions of people are under pressure to take medications to help lower their high blood pressure levels. At the same time, the figure of 75 million people with hypertension may also exist because of a major change to blood pressure level readings that occurred fifteen years ago.

Pressure Changes

For decades, a blood pressure level of 120/80 was considered to be ideal. Anything under 140 was okay. But a change took place in May 2003, when American doctors got new advice from the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure, a government-sanctioned medical panel.

The advice was that suddenly 120 could be thought of as an unsafe level, an indication of a “new” condition termed prehypertension: 120 – 139 systolic pressure. 2 Of course, such readings would sell more hypertension drugs.

Many people who had previously been fine suddenly were told by their doctors that they needed to take blood pressure medication. Nothing had actually changed except for the potential increase in drug sales and the possible side effects that people taking them might experience, including the increased risk of heart failure or stroke. The concept of lowering your blood pressure is to avoid heart problems or stroke, not to take drugs that may possibly give you heart failure or a stroke.

In 2017, new and improved blood pressure guidelines suddenly appeared, so now people with 130/80 systolic pressure readings suddenly have hypertension, not prehypertension (which apparently no longer exists). “The new guideline increases the number of US adults recommended for drug therapy by 4.2 million.”3  And the figure of 75 million increased to more than 100 million American adults with high blood pressure.

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High Blood Pressure Is Serious

Whatever you believe about these readings, high blood pressure is an indicator that your body is under serious pressure. According to the Mayo Clinic, the resulting dangers include damage to the:

  • Arteries
  • Kidneys
  • Heart
  • Brain
  • Eyes

What’s more: “High blood pressure (hypertension) can quietly damage your body for years before symptoms develop.” 4

AIM to Naturally Lower Blood Pressure

It’s not that all medicine is bad for you. There are medical conditions which require drugs as the best, immediate answer. However, it is the proliferation of long-term medicating for health problems that can be improved by lifestyle changes alone that is something worth changing on a widespread and individual level.

Research shows that a diagnosis of high blood pressure may not be one of those life or death situations requiring medication because there are natural options for getting it under control. For example, the Mayo Clinic offers 10 ways to control high blood pressure without medication, one of which includes what should be obvious: eat a healthy diet.5 Or check out the 3 steps from the Good Men Project that include drinking beet juice and eating anti-inflammatory, alkalizing foods and supplementing with non-GMO barley grass, carrot and beet juice powders.6

AIM offers additional lifestyle modifications, some as simple as taking the Garden Trio or drinking Red Rush beet juice concentrate, choices that supplement a healthy diet.

A healthy diet includes a fair amount of plant-based foods because of the incredible variety of healthy nutrients they provide. The Garden Trio delivers concentrated nutrients in the juice powders of barley grass, carrots and beets (more vegetable nitrate as well).

One shot of Red Rush beet juice contains 500 mg of vegetable nitrate, which your body converts to nitric oxide (NO). It’s funny how something abbreviated to “NO” can be so good for you. It has a relaxing effect on arteries, widening them so that blood flows more easily, and lower blood pressure results. 7  It is that simple. Sometimes taking “NO” for an answer is positive.

If you find yourself suddenly under pressure after a diagnosis of hypertension, know that there are natural options for lowering blood pressure.

1https://www.cdc.gov/dhdsp/data_statistics/fact_sheets/fs_bloodpressure.htm

2https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/health/new-blood-pressure-guidelines-pay-off-8212-for-drug-companies/

3http://www.cardiobrief.org/2017/11/13/new-blood-pressure-guideline-sets-lower-13080-threshold/

4https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/high-blood-pressure/in-depth/high-blood-pressure/art-20045868

5https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/high-blood-pressure/in-depth/high-blood-pressure/art-20046974

6https://goodmenproject.com/featured-content/3-steps-to-beet-high-blood-pressure-without-drugs-kcon/

7https://www.webmd.com/hypertension-high-blood-pressure/news/20121212/beetroot-juice-blood-pressure#1

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Since 1982, The AIM Companies has been dedicated to improving the quality of people’s lives with life-changing products and by rewarding passionate Members with a free-enterprise compensation plan.

 

Added Sugar Linked to High Blood Pressure. Salt Linked to Headaches

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How many comic strips have we sat through where a stereotypical husband stares longingly at a hoagie or sits slumped over a salad because their stereotypical cartoon wife disallows them from eating salt due to high blood pressure?  The husband is usually wearing a white tank top and a pork pie hat, the wife with arms crossed,  possibly holding a rolling pin or wearing curlers in her hair. Comic strips are weirdly bleak when you deconstruct them. But anyway, the good news for salt lovers and cartoon husbands is that according to a new study published in Open Heart, added sugar contributes to heart disease more than salt. However, more bad news about salt has soon followed.

In fact, according to this new study, the blood pressure reduction achieved by cutting down on sodium is “slim” and “debatable.” And it’s thought that the carbs and added sugars found in processed foods contribute more to heart disease than the salt.

Medical News Today: 

Ingesting one 24-ounce soft drink has been shown to cause an average maximum increase in blood pressure of 15/9 mm Hg and heart rate of 9 bpm. Those who consume 25% or more calories from added sugar have an almost threefold increased risk of death due to cardiovascular disease, according to the research.

The biggest offender is high fructose corn syrup. Most natural sugars have a balance of fructose and glucose and are considered beneficial in fruits and veggies, but HFCS is not balanced, and the current thinking is that this imbalance can lead to acidic blood that damages the lining of the veins.

Although this study may take some heat off of salt. Another study published in BMJ Open, put the heat back on. Researchers found a link between salt and headaches.  Test subjects who ate 8 g of sodium suffered one-third  more headaches than those who only consumed 4 g. Headaches occurred in the participants regardless of how healthy their diets were otherwise. The average American consumes 3,400 mg of sodium. The daily recommended amount is 1500 mg.