Fiber Linked to Decreased Risk of Diabetes in Large-Scale Study

Fiber

New research out of Europe has linked the increased consumption of cereal fiber to a reduced risk of diabetes. This isn’t the first time that scientists have found an inverse link between a high fiber diet and diabetes. However, the study–The EPIC-InterAct–is the world’s largest study of type 2 diabetes. Over 350,000 people participated in the 11-year study, including over 12,000 type-2 diabetes sufferers.

Recently, data collected from that study regarding fiber was analyzed and published in Diabetologia.  Those who consumed more than 26 grams of fiber per day were 18% less likely to develop diabetes when compared to people who only ingested 19 grams of fiber daily. Next, they pooled the information found in the EPIC-Interact study with 18 other studies worldwide and found that for every 10g increase in daily fiber, the risk of diabetes dropped by 9%. Amazingly, however, when they examined cereal fiber (fiber from grains, not fruits and vegetables) the risk of diabetes dropped by a whopping 25% for each 10g daily increase.

From Medical Xpress

 “Taken together, our results indicate that individuals with diets rich in fibre, in particular cereal fibre, may be at lower risk of type 2 diabetes. We are not certain why this might be, but potential mechanisms could include feeling physically full for longer, prolonged release of hormonal signals, slowed down nutrient absorption, or altered fermentation in the large intestine. All these mechanisms could lead to a lower BMI and reduced risk of developing type 2 diabetes. As well as helping keep weight down, dietary fibre may also affect diabetes risk by other mechanisms—for instance improving control of blood sugar and decreasing insulin peaks after meals, and increasing the body’s sensitivity to insulin.”

Author: The AIM Companies

Nutrition that Works!

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