FAT

There are so many contradictory ideas floating around about fat and the amount you should consume in your diet. Just like most things in life, one size doesn’t fit all. So it is good to turn to science and not just the latest diet fad to try to find some answers.

The focus of the November 2018 issue of Science magazine was diet and health, and the introduction to this special edition included the following statement: “Advice on what constitutes a healthy diet is more prevalent and more inconsistent than ever.” Fat is a large part of the inconsistencies.

The questions of which type of diet is better—high-fat and low-carbohydrate or low-fat and high carbohydrate—were addressed in a review that looked at whether or not dietary fat had gone from being an enemy to a friend. Or is it just the type of fat that you consume?

Again, confusing, contradictory suggestions are out there. That’s why the relationship between what you consume and what it does to your health is worth scientific examination to sort out what is best even though science doesn’t have the definitive answer for everyone.

Scientific Results

Apparently no specific dietary ratio of carbohydrates and fats is best for most people. As well, people have different metabolisms, so whichever diet is chosen, it won’t necessarily deliver similar metabolic effects.

The closest thing to an answer in the review is that many people do well with a quality diet in regard to a reduction of processed foods, such as refined grains and sugar, and a considerable healthy variety of macronutrients, namely protein, fats and carbohydrates. This answer is one that The AIM Companies has been suggesting for nearly four decades.

Essential Fatty Acid Results

The specific results in regard to fat, from an AIM perspective, are not surprising either. Omega-3 and -6 are essential fatty acids because the human body cannot synthesize these polyunsaturated fats that are “critical components of every human cell membrane.” Essential fatty acids (EFAs) are available in a balanced 2:1 ratio of omega-3 and -6 in the organic seed oils in AIMega.

The review results go on to state that both EFAs are precursors of the eicosanoid hormones that mediate immunity, inflammation, insulin resistance and blood clotting. One of the monumental statements is that increasing omega-3 intake alters expression of more than 6,000 genes.

The review also referenced a large cohort study that indicates higher intake of polyunsaturated fat lowered the risk of type 2 diabetes, especially in regard to blood levels of linoleic acid, which is found in each capsule of AIMega.

As far as cholesterol is concerned, saturated fats increase blood cholesterol concentrations, whereas polyunsaturated fats reduce cholesterol levels, so the “essential” quality of fat counts.

In the end, whatever you consume, it all boils down to quality. That’s why choosing the best foods and supplements is so important for your health. Supplements such as AIMega provide a quality source of fat that is essential for good health.

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The AIM Companies has been dedicated to improving the quality of people’s lives with life-changing products like BarleyLife and AIMega and by rewarding passionate Members with a free-enterprise compensation plan.

Another Link Between Probiotics and Weight Management

Probiotics-Wgt-Mgmt

The difference between a diet high in fish oils and one chock-full of lard is pretty obvious.  What hasn’t been obvious is the metabolic effects that these diets can have on our gut microbes.  Researchers in Sweden looked into the quandary, publishing their results in Cell Metabolism.

In the study, there were two groups of mice. One group of mice were given healthy fats (fish oils). The other group were given unhealthy fats (lard).   The two groups had very different gut floras, but when gut flora from the fish-oil mice were injected into other mice (from a third group), that new gut flora was able to protect the third-group mice from inflammation and diet-based weight gain.   This means “that gut microbes are an independent factor aggravating inflammation associated with diet-induced obesity and gives hope that a probiotic might help counteract a “greasy” diet.” —Cell Press

“We wanted to determine whether gut microbes directly contribute to the metabolic differences associated with diets rich in healthy and unhealthy fats,” says first study author Robert Caesar of the University of Gothenburg. Even though the study was done in mice, “our goal is to identify interventions for optimizing metabolic health in humans.”

In their next set of studies, the researchers plan to see if the gut flora from the fish-oil mice can aid the lard-eating mice.

Get your healthy fats from AIM’s AIMega and probiotics from FloraFood!

AIMega  Basics of Probiotics