Improving Vision with Nutrition

What Is Low Vision?

Low vision is when a person has difficulty seeing even when wearing glasses, contacts lens or after having eye surgery. It affects one out of six adults over age 45 and one out of four adults over age 75. Low vision can be caused by conditions such as age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma.

Prevention

Nutritional intake plays a major role in preventing diseases, and this includes conditions that affect vision. Eating foods and taking supplements that provide nutrients that the body cannot produce, such as lutein and zeaxanthin—carotenoid pigments found in the macula—and beta-carotene, give the eyes nutritional support for staying healthy.1 All three plant-based micronutrients are structurally related to vitamin A.

Vitamin A helps to maintain clear corneas. Consumption of lutein and zeaxanthin has been shown to lower the risk of age-related macular degeneration.2 Along with a diet that provides these micronutrients, the age-related eye disease studies (AREDS) recommends sup­plementing with nutrients that include beta-caro­tene, lutein and zeaxanthin to prevent macular degeneration.

AIM Eye Nutrition

Among the many healthy nutrients found in carrots, the juice powder in Just Carrots provides a concentrated source of beta-carotene that the body converts to vitamin A. Beta-carotene is also an antioxidant that protects against free radical damage that can cause eye issues.

GinkgoSense contains both lutein and zeaxanthin, which are also powerful anti-
oxidants that protect the eyes from oxidative stress. And there are more eye-healthy ingredients in the GinkgoSense formula, including Ginkgo biloba and bilberry.
A 2012 study published in the Journal of Medicinal Food3 revealed that Ginkgo biloba extract (GBE) and the anthocyanins in bilberry fruit could be effective for improving visual function in patients with normal-tension glaucoma (NTG), which damages the optic nerve.

February is Low Vision Awareness Month for good reason. According to the Glaucoma Research Foundation, around 3 million Americans have it.

The study determined that eye health benefits of GBE and bilberry anthocyanins are likely to include improved circulation and protective antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, along with improved cognitive function. The brain-boosting effect puts the sense in GinkgoSense.

The right nutrients can help to prevent low vision, and Just Carrots and GinkgoSense are just two of several AIM supplements that deliver eye-healthy nutrition.

References accessed November 16, 2018

1 https://www.brightfocus.org/macular/article/lutein-and-zeaxanthin-protection-against-macular
2 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15604618
3 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3429325/

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The AIM Companies has been dedicated to improving the quality of people’s lives with life-changing products like Just Carrots and GinkgoSense and by rewarding passionate Members with a free-enterprise compensation plan.

Carrots: Orange You Glad You’ve Lowered Your Risk of Age-Related Macular Degeneration?

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It’s pretty well established that carrots and their inherent nutrients are good for your eyeballs. In fact, a complete lack of vitamin A will devastate your corneas, and just a little bit of vitamin A deficiency will dry your peepers out. Beta carotene can also help improve your night vision because vitamin A assists the eyes in converting low light into “easy-to-think” brain signals.

But a study released earlier this month, found that carrots may significantly lower the risk of age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), the most common and severe cause of vision loss in people over sixty.

Researchers from the hallowed halls of Harvard U followed 100,000 people over the age of fifty for twenty-five years and learned that folks who chowed down on the highest levels of the carotenoids zeaxanthin and lutein had a forty percent lower risk of developing the advanced form of ARMD than those who ate the fewest carotenoids. They also found that people who were getting alpha-carotene, beta-carotene and beta-cryptoxanthin in great amounts lowered their risk of AMRD by twenty-five to thirty-five percent when compared to people who didn’t eat that stuff so much.

Researchers accredit lutein and zeaxanthin for these positive benefits due to their ability to protect the macular of the eye by acting as antioxidants that filter out damaging blue light and defending cells from free radical damage.

You’ll find plenty of carotenoids in Just Carrots.