Young Adults Who Eat Their Fruits and Vegetables Have Fewer Heart Problems Later

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The current crop of youthful people, the “Millennials” –those born between 1982 and 2001–are one of the biggest emerging markets in the world. Forbes magazine reports that they prefer cheap and convenient food with the caveat that they are also willing to pay for healthy food and will even go out of their way to search for it.  AIM provides inexpensive, healthy whole-food juice products that are both high-quality and very nutritious.

With that being said, a new study published in Circulation journal reported that young adults who eat their fruits and vegetables had less coronary artery plaque twenty years later. Researchers followed over 2,500 participants for two decades and placed the participants into three groups based on how many fruits and veggies they consumed–the most, a medium amount and the lowest amounts.

Those who ate the highest amounts of fruits and veggies (more than five servings) had a twenty-six percent lower chance of developing calcified plaque twenty years later when compared to those who ate the least. A buildup of calcified plaque is the main cause of atherosclerosis which can lead to stroke and heart attacks.

There is a widely established connection between fruit and vegetable consumption and heart health in middle-aged people. However, this is the first study that examined the diets of young adults.

So if you’re a young adult or know someone who is, then this is the perfect time to introduce them to AIM’s line of whole-food juice concentrates. They’re convenient (No-hassle juicing!). At a per-serving price they are extremely affordable, and they are also incredibly healthy.

Author: The AIM Companies

Nutrition that Works!

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