AIM Turned My Life Around

55

My story goes back to my late thirties. I felt held captive by a chronic fatigue that I could not shake. I never knew from day to day if I would have energy for even mild physical activities. Even enjoyable things like dancing or raspberry-picking were often too exhausting for me to endure.

My enthusiasm was dimming more and more. I felt anxious or depressed. But thankfully, a very lovely, elderly woman told me about the benefits of AIM’s barley grass powder. A hope was sparked that somehow nutrition could be a significant solution. Twice a day I took it while making changes in my diet. My energy level increased dramatically.

Although I was no longer tired all the time, my fitness level was very low. However, I wasn’t in a place to even consider starting exercise before taking greens like AIM BarleyLife. A strong desire to be fit began to grow in me, so I bought a book on running and started out. I called my run the geriatric shuffle because I was ridiculously slow. But I loved it.

My mood also dramatically improved with running. It was like I had come out from under a dark cloud into the sunshine of a brand new day. I made a wonderful running friend, and we began to challenge ourselves with various kinds of running: hills, sprints, intervals, long runs. It was so much fun. I was so relieved and thankful because the chronic fatigue was just a memory.

When AIM LeafGreens came out, I began to take it, noticing an increase in stamina. My dear friend also took it with wonderful results.

When I was fifty-two, my son showed me video clips of the Tough Mudder and Spartan races, both challenging events for physical fitness and stamina. Silent tears flowed down my cheeks as I watched, longing to be able to participate in such events.

I wanted so much to be successful. I had heard some good things about the benefits of CrossFit, so I excitedly signed up. The overall physical benefits have been huge for me. Not only was I able to finish the Tough Mudder event with no problem, but I can participate in countless physical activities with fun and success.

It is true that you get out of exercise what you put into it. I call this “making deposits in my fitness account.” The workouts are always very demanding, but I like to “make good nutrition deposits.”

I gave AIM Red Rush a try after reading some testimonials and immediately experienced a boost in my workout. I would describe it as “my engine feels more powerful.” I am able to get a little more done a little faster without overdoing it. I am fifty-five now and find it fun and amazing that I am still growing and improving.

Shared by Suzanne Atkinson, AIM Group Builder in Mono, Ontario

Just Carrots: Strength in Simplicity

Strength in Simplicity

We live in an age where everything we buy is also something else. Our phones are cameras. Our watches are computers. You can play games on portable stereo systems, and there are now computers that can be used like books. Two-in-one items might serve double purposes, but neither purpose seems to work half as well.

Luckily in a world of unnecessary complications, there is still Just Carrots.  Just Carrots is as no-nonsense as its name implies. It says what it is, and it is what it says. When you open up the canister, there are no surprises, no bells, no whistles, just carrots. You might think its old-fashioned, but we believe there is certain strength in simplicity that’s often overlooked these days. Lately, the news about carrots and the carotenoids they contain— alpha- and beta-carotene—have shown how strong that simplicity can be. First off, a new long-term study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that high concentrations of carotenoids in the blood, specifically alpha- and betacarotene and lycopene, were linked to an 18-28% reduction in breast cancer risk. Starting in 1989, researchers took the blood samples of over 30,000 women and had them fill out questionnaires to assess their baseline risks for breast cancer. In 2000, more than 18,000 of those women donated blood a second time. And by 2010, 2,188 women had developed breast cancer. Researchers compared the blood of the afflicted women with blood of women who shared similar baseline risks and found that the women who had the highest amounts of carotenoids in their blood also had an 18-28% lower risk of breast cancer when compared to those with the lowest amount of blood carotenoids. Additionally, this study suggested that high levels of blood carotenoids also reduced tumor severity and recurrence.

Also making the news was a 2014 Dutch study published in Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases. In the paper, researchers found that high levels of alpha-carotene were associated with a 15% decrease in diabetes risk and that beta-carotene levels were linked to a 22% reduction. Scientists believe that the diminution of this risk comes from the antioxidant effects of the carotenes via a reduction in oxidative stress commonly associated with diabetes. The study followed nearly 40,000 Europeans for ten years. Additionally, only food sources of alpha- and beta-carotene were analyzed.

Just Carrots contains no hoopla, just all the food-sourced alpha- and beta-carotene one needs to maintain a healthy diet and lifestyle.

LeafGreens: Greener and Leafier

LeafGreens

The new LeafGreens formula just got a whole lot healthier with the addition of three new “super” vegetables: arugula, Swiss chard and kale. We removed faba bean and field pea leaves but made sure to replace the kaempferol and quercetin that they supplied. You’ll still be getting a similar zesty taste just with more vitamins, flavanols and phytonutrients packed into every healthier, greener and leafier serving.

Swiss Chard
Swiss chard is a leafy vegetable in the same family as spinach. It contains significant amounts of vitamins C, E and K, magnesium, manganese, potassium and iron. It’s also a source of chlorophyll, dietary nitrate, alphalipoic acid, betalains, beta-carotene, lutein,and zeaxanthin.

What’s New?
Swiss chard contains thirteen different types of antioxidants, including kaempferol and syringic acid, a flavonoid that according to a study published in the Journal of Acute Disease helps to stabilize blood sugars.

Kale
Popular in its own right, kale is a leafy green or purple cruciferous vegetable related to cauliflower and Brussel sprouts. It is known for its vitamins A, C and K, copper, potassium, iron, manganese, calcium and phosphorus content. It also has lutein, zeaxanthin, quercetin and kaempferol.

What’s New?
Kale contains both kaempferol and quercetin. Kale, along with other cruciferous vegetables, is known for its supply of indoles. According to the National Cancer Institute research has shown that indoles “inhibit the development of cancer in several organs in rats and mice, including the bladder, breast, colon, liver, lung, and stomach.”

Arugula
Arugula, also known as rocket lettuce, is a green cruciferous vegetable. It’s a good source for vitamins A, C and K, calcium as well as dietary nitrate, alpha-lipoic acid and chlorophyll. Like broccoli, it contains sulfuraphane and indoles.

What’s New?
As a cruciferous vegetable, arugula shares a lot of redundant properties with broccoli and kale. However, arugula has been noted for its thiocyanate content which was shown to suppress inflammatory mediators in a study published in the aptly named Mediators of Inflammation.

LeafGreens2

Vitamin A Helps Move Immune Cells to the Gut

Carrots for the Immune System

You may have heard that seventy percent of your immune system is in your gut.  That’s a neat, simple and surprisingly true claim, but why is seventy percent of the immune system located there?  Is it because of the large amount of symbiotic gut flora that calls your stomach home? Well, partly, but it seems that it’s a bit more complicated then that. Here is the million-dollar explanation from some scientists who published a study in the journal of Clinical and Experimental Immunology.

The gastrointestinal system plays a central role in immune system homeostasis. It is the main route of contact with the external environment and is overloaded every day with external stimuli, sometimes dangerous as pathogens (bacteria, protozoa, fungi, viruses) or toxic substances, in other cases very useful as food or commensal flora. The crucial position of the gastrointestinal system is testified by the huge amount of immune cells that reside within it. Indeed, gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) is the prominent part of mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) and represents almost 70% of the entire immune system;

The ten dollar explanation: Necessity. We eat things with germs and fungus on them and those things go right to our tummies. We can’t not eat, so our guts became the central loci for our bodies’ defenses. We can also thank our belly-bound buddy, the gut flora for the role it plays keeping us healthy. The gut flora is basically a gatekeeper that spurs the immune system into action whenever it/they come across something it/they don’t particularly like.  That’s why probiotics usage is so important, and all that lymph tissue represents the bulk of the human body’s ability to fight off invaders when our bossy gut flora commands it.

So where does vitamin A fit in to this fine system?

For years studies have shown that when someone was vitamin A deficient that their immune system was also in tatters, but it wasn’t quite clear why this was the way it was. Well, folks, today some scientists appear to have an answer.  According to a study published in the July issue of Immunity,  retinoic acid a metabolite from digested vitamin A is necessary because it guides innate immune cells to their proper places. The retinoic acid activate receptors that send them straight to the intestines where they settle in mucosal barrier tissues.

From the Press Release:

“It is important that these cells be concentrated in mucosal barrier tissues, as opposed to scattered throughout the body, because these tissues are the point of entry for many infections from bacteria, viruses and parasites,” Kim said. “Now that we have established the system of migration for these cells, we can play with it a little and see what changes the behavior and function of the cells.”

So eat your carrots! They’re essential!

Kai Applequist: Teamwork, Organization and Nutrition

Kai

Preferred Member and Red Rush Athlete Kai Applequist is the director of the Mercedes Benz presented by George’s Cycles bicycle racing team based out of Boise, Idaho. It’s the only elite cycling team in the state, composed solely of cyclists who have achieved the highest amateur rank, a mere notch below pro.

Formerly a professional cyclist, Kai’s career as co-captain of the Exergy racing team came to an abrupt halt in 2012 after the front wheel of his bike detached and he was flung face first into the asphalt. It took months for him to recover, and he wasn’t sure if he’d ride anymore. Kai took up the much safer running for a very short while, but when he got back on a bike, he was hooked all over again.

Founded in 2012, the Mercedes Benz p/b George’s team has accumulated over one hundred podium finishes and six state titles in that relatively short time. Kai credits organization as the key to the team’s success. Cyclists and cycling in general, tend to be individualistic, so when forming his team, Kai wanted to focus on planning, preparation and teamwork while downplaying those individualistic aspects.

“The thing I like about my team is that they all have their own businesses or they’re highlevel CEOs. They’re good at cycling because they do everything with the same purpose. When they show up to a race, their bike is clean, adjusted and ready to go. They behave the way you’d imagine adults would behave,” Kai said.

Cycling strategy is deceptively complex and teamwork is of paramount importance. It seems like the strongest guy should win every race, but wind, terrain and psychology all play factors. It’s why you see cyclists riding in formation like migrating birds. They’re drafting. It’s a way to block and manipulate air currents so that the team’s “best” rider, i.e., their sprinter (fast rider) or their climber (good at hills), is fresh for the final stretch. However, sometimes a team will have a strategic or psychological  advantage and will break away from the pack or “go on the attack.” That’s exactly how Kai and his team won a race earlier this spring.

“I had three teammates with me, so I attacked and nobody chased me. It was a total psychology thing. The other guys in the group could have tried to pull me back, but they knew that my teammates would have attacked. So they didn’t chase me down,” Kai said.

Another part of their strategy is the good nutrition from AIM products like Red Rush®, Peak Endurance® and ProPeas®.

“Red Rush plays a factor in preparation. The guys on the team who don’t normally use supplements have been using it and seeing results, even the old-school guys who bring ham sandwiches on their rides. Red Rush as well as Peak Endurance and ProPeas are integral in having a healthy and balanced nutrition plan. I really like the Peak Endurance. It has a good electrolyte profile as well as the B-vitamins for breaking down those carbohydrates during exercise. ProPeas is a very natural and usable protein for athletes and individuals.”