Q&A: AIM Members Commonly Ask These Questions

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I have read that cruciferous vegetables can negatively affect those with hypothyroidism or those prone to hypothyroidism. Am I at risk when taking LeafGreens?

There has only been one case that links cruciferous vegetables to hypothyroidism in humans — an 88-year-old woman who ate 1-1.5 kilograms (2-3 pounds or 1,000- 1,500 grams) of bok choy daily. A human study found that 150 grams of cooked Brussels sprouts for four weeks had no negative effects on thyroid function. To put this all in perspective, a single serving of LeafGreens is 3.5 grams.

I heard that former smokers should not take beta-carotene supplements? Should I be worried about the beta-carotene in Just Carrots?

The beta-carotene found in Just Carrots is produced naturally from the carrots. The beta-carotene found in foods poses no cancer risk. Synthetic vitamins that contain beta carotene have been found in four large studies in the 1990s to increase the risk of lung cancer in smokers.

What is the difference between BarleyLife and other off-the-shelf barley grass powders?

BarleyLife is a juice powder concentrate.

I was told years ago by an upline that we should not take any other products with Herbal Fiberblend as it moves through your system quickly instead of being absorbed. Has that changed?

Psyllium may reduce nutrient absorption, and we’ve recommended taking watersoluble supplements separately as a precaution so that Members receive the greatest value from their products. However, if the only way you can take your Herbal Fiberblend is by mixing it with CalciAIM, Peak Endurance or another AIM product then we encourage you to do so. Although a small percentage may not be absorbed consuming the products should be your primary goal.

If you have a question about nutrition or any of our products, please feel free to send it to
aimonline@aimintl.com.

Young Adults Who Eat Their Fruits and Vegetables Have Fewer Heart Problems Later

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The current crop of youthful people, the “Millennials” –those born between 1982 and 2001–are one of the biggest emerging markets in the world. Forbes magazine reports that they prefer cheap and convenient food with the caveat that they are also willing to pay for healthy food and will even go out of their way to search for it.  AIM provides inexpensive, healthy whole-food juice products that are both high-quality and very nutritious.

With that being said, a new study published in Circulation journal reported that young adults who eat their fruits and vegetables had less coronary artery plaque twenty years later. Researchers followed over 2,500 participants for two decades and placed the participants into three groups based on how many fruits and veggies they consumed–the most, a medium amount and the lowest amounts.

Those who ate the highest amounts of fruits and veggies (more than five servings) had a twenty-six percent lower chance of developing calcified plaque twenty years later when compared to those who ate the least. A buildup of calcified plaque is the main cause of atherosclerosis which can lead to stroke and heart attacks.

There is a widely established connection between fruit and vegetable consumption and heart health in middle-aged people. However, this is the first study that examined the diets of young adults.

So if you’re a young adult or know someone who is, then this is the perfect time to introduce them to AIM’s line of whole-food juice concentrates. They’re convenient (No-hassle juicing!). At a per-serving price they are extremely affordable, and they are also incredibly healthy.

Thylakoids: How Leafy Green Vegetables May Help with Weight Loss

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It’s hard to find fault with green, leafy vegetables these days. Besides for containing lots of dietary nitrate, antioxidants, vitamins, minerals, fiber among other things, they also have a compound called thylakoids.  A thylakoid is “a membrane-bound compartment inside chloroplasts (cell-food producers) and cyanobacteria (bacteria like blue-green algae that gets energy through photosynthesis).”  New research has shown that thylakoids may help with weight loss and/or weight management through appetite suppression.

A study published at the beginning of June in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition strengthens the case for weight-loss benefits of thylakoids.  In the study, they looked at sixty obese and overweight individuals. Some were given five grams of spinach extract and others were given a placebo. Blood was drawn at various times to assess cholesterol, glucose, etc. Four hours after lunch, participants were shown images of foods and took a survey to gauge hunger. Finally, they were offered Tombstone pizzas and were told to eat as much as they liked. Those who had taken the spinach extract saw a two-hour reduction in their hunger levels after thylakoid consumption.

This isn’t the first study that links thylakoids to weight loss. Research published in the October 2014 issue of Appetite was the first human study.

In this study we demonstrated for the first time that green-plant membranes, when added to the diet daily for three months, markedly reduced body weight in overweight women. In addition, total and LDL-cholesterol levels were reduced compared to control. These findings are supported by animal studies, where body weight loss and blood lipid lowering effects have been observed (Kohnke et al, 2009 and Montelius et al, 2013).

The AIM Companies has several products–BarleyLife, CoCoa LeafGreens, BarleyLife Xtra–that contain leafy green vegetables but the most notable is Leaf Greens, a product that will be getting a new formulation soon, making it leafier and greener. It will contain several heavy hitter from the leafy green vegetable kingdom: kale, chard, arugula and spinach. And besides for being excellent sources of folate, vitamin K and carotenoids, it seems that it may aid in appetite suppression as well.

 

A Healthy Diet a Day May Keep COPD at Bay

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Recently, they did a study that found beet juice may be able to help people who suffer COPD increase their ability to exercise.  In the lab trials, those who imbibed beetroot juice saw a significant increase in mobility.However, it turns out that beet juice is just the tip of the food pyramid when it comes to COPD.

Researchers assessed the lives of nearly 100,000 people–about 66% women–during a span of nearly twenty years and found that a healthy diet seemed to cut the risk of COPD by one third. As defined by the research, a healthy diet was one that included lots of vegetables, whole grains, unsaturated fat, nuts and omega-3 fatty acids and contained low to moderate amounts of refined grains, red and processed meats, sugary drinks and alcohol. BMI, age and ethnicity did not seem to be factors. The researchers cite antioxidant activity as the source of the possible health benefits.

Medical News Today 

As the lungs exist in a high oxygen environment, it is reasonable to posit that certain exposures (and local inflammation) can further increase the burden of oxidants,” they note. “The balance between these potentially toxic substances and the protective actions of antioxidant defenses, including those derived from diet, may play a role in the loss of lung function over time and the eventual development of COPD.”